Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Chickens, Prints and Plums

For some reason I was on a chicken phase earlier this week. I'm having an art sale here soon.(Saturday, July 21st, in the afternoon. Save the date!)
I didn't do a very good job with these photos below, forgot a few phases, but I think you can get the idea of how to make reduction prints. I used 'Soft-Kut' rubber, easier to carve into than linoleum. You can make many prints with these...
First, I inked the plain rubber, and printed backgrounds.
Then I carved into the rubber around a shape...and printed that on top of the background.
Finally, I carved away everything but where I wanted that last dark color to go.

Voila, a chicken!

Maybe I got the idea from my son building a chicken coop for our neighbors...
Yes, a new home for these beauties. Aren't those feathers gorgeous?

While I was over there, I noticed their plums were ripe. Time to make some jam! These plums make the best jam in the world, I don't know what variety they are, but super tart-sweet. I just cut them up skins and all, take out the pits. Cook them down for quite a while with a little lemon juice, and half as much sugar as plums. Delicious!

5 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing the process with photos! I used to make woodblock prints in my youth, but it was so much work that somewhere along the way I stopped doing it. What you did seems more playful and fun than I remember, and it inspires me to give that new material a try. :)

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    1. You're welcome! Try it, it's fun! Planning ahead is the key.

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  2. Hi Kieren, So HAPPY you wrote and now I can peep in on what you're doing. Loved this posting and love the chickies.

    All simple joys to you,

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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  3. Wow, so cool to see your process. Very labor intensive (or so it seems to me) but so so worth it. I love your style!

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    1. Thanks for the comment. It actually goes pretty fast... the tricky part is thinking ahead, so you don't cut out something you want to keep.

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